Leave A Mark

by - Tuesday, March 22, 2011

bob
Leave A Mark

When?
23rd March 2011

What Time?
12PM - 2PM

Where?
Taylor's Lakeside Campus

Objective?
To create awareness regarding the Bario children.

Day event?
For one person to paint their hand with provided paint and leave a hand print on a canvas that is provided too. To aim 1,000 people.

Sponsor?
DiGI (With contest), Jotun, Tony & Guy & Ribena.

More info?
www.facebook.com/BringOnBario,
www.twitter.com/BringOnBario

What is Bario?
Bario is located at the border between Kalimantan and Sarawak. It is the unofficial capital of the Kelabit Highlands, home of the Kelabit tribe who are known today for their friendliness and hospitality, overshadowing their traditional past being headhunters. The Kelabit at approximately 5000 people, are one of the smallest ethnic groups in the state of Sarawak. Historically, they are a community that inhabit the Kelabit Highlands, a plateau with an altitude approximately 1000 meters above sea level and situated above the furthest reaches of the navigable rivers of Baram and Limbang Districts of Northeastern Sarawak. The community is known for its agriculture, mainly growing Bario rice and sweet pineapple.

According to Sarawak Tourism Board, Bario rice “has long been regarded as one of the finest rice grains of the world. It is famous for its soft texture, fine and elongated grains with mild aromas and splendid taste. The rice is a home-grown, laboriously planted and harvested by hands using age-old traditional methods. In the planting of the Bario rice, there is no usage of pesticides and chemical fertilizers. It has all the attributes of organic rice with an added flavour and unique taste as a result of the cool, pristine and unpolluted environments where it is grown. It is perfect for health conscious consumers.”


There are even apples (Anna, Rome Beauty, Granny Smith and Manalagi varieties) grown in Ba’Kelalan – a short flight north east from Bario or 2 days trek. It had taken the Paran brothers over 20 years to harvest the apples successfully. The natives here are of the Lun Bawang tribe. Today, the Kelabits represent one of the most well educated tribes whose descendants are studying and working all around the world.

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